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dc.contributor.authorJung, Hyoo-Ko-
dc.date.available2016-04-01T07:39:41Z-
dc.date.created2015-02-02-
dc.date.issued2014-06-
dc.identifier.issn1520-7412-
dc.identifier.other2014-OAK-0000030720-
dc.identifier.urihttps://oasis.postech.ac.kr/handle/2014.oak/26743-
dc.description.abstractDuring the Pacific War, problems concerning the future of Korea were actively discussed in the conferences of the Institute of Pacific Relations (IPR, 1925-1960), which was noted as an international non-governmental organization specializing in problems in the Asia-Pacific region. In its international conferences (Mont Tremblant, Quebec, Canada, 1942; Hot Springs, Virginia, U.S., 1945), decolonization was the most controversial issue because it was deeply concerned with defining not only the war ideology', but also the nature of the postwar world order. The Korean problem was treated in relation to the future of the occupied areas of Japan, and all options were on the table. This article describes what kind of an organization the IPR was, and then goes into the details of the diverse views on the future of Korea in its international conferences. The crux of the matter was choosing either to implement a "mandate" over Korea or to allow Korea "immediate independence" after the war. Chinese, British and American delegates attending the conferences generally expressed the view that international administration or some form of international assistance would be needed during the period prior to full admission of Korea to the international community. However, Andrew J. Grajdanzev, research associate of the International Secretariat of the IPR, argued for the immediate independence of Korea. He also maintained that liberated Korea should build "a cooperative commonwealth" based on the nationalization of its main industries and land reform. His argument seems to have reflected a progressive tendency within the International Secretariat after the Great Depression.-
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityungraded-
dc.languageEnglish-
dc.publisher한국학연구원-
dc.titleThe Institute of Pacific Relations and the Korean Problem during the Pacific War-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.contributor.college인문사회학부-
dc.author.google고정휴-
dc.relation.volume17-
dc.relation.issue1-
dc.relation.startpage429-
dc.relation.lastpage453-
dc.contributor.id10048868-
dc.relation.journalActa Koreana-
dc.relation.sciSCI-
dc.collections.nameJournal Papers-
dc.type.rimsART-
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationActa Koreana, v.17, no.1, pp.429 - 453-
dc.citation.endPage453-
dc.citation.number1-
dc.citation.startPage429-
dc.citation.titleActa Koreana-
dc.citation.volume17-
dc.contributor.affiliatedAuthorJung, Hyoo-Ko-
dc.identifier.scopusid2-s2.0-84903637573-
dc.description.journalClass1-
dc.description.isOpenAccessY-
dc.type.docTypeARTICLE-

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고정휴JUNG, HYOO KO
Div of Humanities and Social Sciences
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