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Feelings on Facebook and their correlates with psychological well-being: The moderating role of culture

Title
Feelings on Facebook and their correlates with psychological well-being: The moderating role of culture
Authors
KIM, JINHEEStavrositu, Carmen
POSTECH Authors
KIM, JINHEE
Date Issued
Dec-2018
Publisher
PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD
Abstract
The current study explores four types of emotions reflecting distinct dimensions of social orientation—interpersonal affiliation vs. distance, and valence—positive vs. negative, that users may experience on Facebook and their relationship to psychological well-being through two distinct routes: perceived relationship harmony and perceived control. A survey was conducted in the U.S. (n = 320) and South Korea (n = 336) to explore these relationships, as well as the moderating role of culture (i.e., valuing interdependence vs. independence). Results show that experiencing socially engaging emotions, whether positive (e.g., friendliness) or negative (e.g., shame), is positively associated with life satisfaction through perceived relationship harmony with Facebook friends for users valuing interdependence (vs. independence). In contrast, experiencing positive disengaging emotions (e.g., pride) is positively associated with perceived control in a Facebook context for users valuing independence (vs. interdependence). Perceived control is positively related to life satisfaction for users valuing independence (vs. interdependence) when experiencing positive emotions, whether engaging or disengaging (e.g., anger). Implications regarding adaptive consequences of experiencing culturally fit emotions on Facebook are discussed. © 2018 Elsevier Ltd
The current study explores four types of emotions reflecting distinct dimensions of social orientation—interpersonal affiliation vs. distance, and valence—positive vs. negative, that users may experience on Facebook and their relationship to psychological well-being through two distinct routes: perceived relationship harmony and perceived control. A survey was conducted in the U.S. (n = 320) and South Korea (n = 336) to explore these relationships, as well as the moderating role of culture (i.e., valuing interdependence vs. independence). Results show that experiencing socially engaging emotions, whether positive (e.g., friendliness) or negative (e.g., shame), is positively associated with life satisfaction through perceived relationship harmony with Facebook friends for users valuing interdependence (vs. independence). In contrast, experiencing positive disengaging emotions (e.g., pride) is positively associated with perceived control in a Facebook context for users valuing independence (vs. interdependence). Perceived control is positively related to life satisfaction for users valuing independence (vs. interdependence) when experiencing positive emotions, whether engaging or disengaging (e.g., anger). Implications regarding adaptive consequences of experiencing culturally fit emotions on Facebook are discussed. © 2018 Elsevier Ltd
Keywords
Social networking (online); Emotion; Facebook; Independence-interdependence; Relationship harmony; Well being; Behavioral research; anger; article; controlled study; friend; human; life satisfaction; major clinical study; psychological well-being; shame; South Korea
URI
http://oasis.postech.ac.kr/handle/2014.oak/93975
DOI
10.1016/j.chb.2018.07.024
ISSN
0747-5632
Article Type
Article
Citation
COMPUTERS IN HUMAN BEHAVIOR, vol. 89, page. 79 - 87, 2018-12
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Div of Humanities and Social Sciences
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