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Role of Convective Precipitation in the Relationship between Subdaily Extreme Precipitation and Temperature

Title
Role of Convective Precipitation in the Relationship between Subdaily Extreme Precipitation and Temperature
Authors
MIN, SEUNG KIPARK, IN HONG
POSTECH Authors
MIN, SEUNG KI
Date Issued
Dec-2017
Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Abstract
On a subdaily time scale, the intensities of extreme precipitation are observed to increase with temperature at a rate exceeding water vapor constraints determined by the Clausius–Clapeyron (C-C) relationship. This so-called super C-C scaling has been suggested to occur as a result of 1) the statistical effect that involves the transition of precipitation types from stratiform to convective events and 2) the physical effect by which the convective process itself can overcome the thermodynamic limitation. This study examines these two mechanisms for the super C-C relationship using in situ observations in South Korea for a recent 35-yr period, focusing on the role of convective rainfall. Scaling results show that hourly extreme precipitation undergoes a transition from a C-C rate to a super C-C rate at around 208C, supporting the statistical effect. The transition temperature observed in South Korea is, however, much higher than in European regions (128C), which seems to be due to the climatologically lower frequency of convective events in South Korea than in Europe. Nevertheless, the threshold fraction of convective precipitation when the scaling transition starts to occur is found to very similar between two regions, around 0.2, indicating the important role of convective events in shaping the scaling. On the other hand, convective extreme precipitation alone exhibits a super C-C scaling, suggesting that the physical effect is also at work in South Korea. Also, the scaling shows a robust peaklike shape with maximum precipitation intensity near 248C, which is closely linked with moisture limitation at high temperature, supporting the previous findings.
On a subdaily time scale, the intensities of extreme precipitation are observed to increase with temperature at a rate exceeding water vapor constraints determined by the Clausius–Clapeyron (C-C) relationship. This so-called super C-C scaling has been suggested to occur as a result of 1) the statistical effect that involves the transition of precipitation types from stratiform to convective events and 2) the physical effect by which the convective process itself can overcome the thermodynamic limitation. This study examines these two mechanisms for the super C-C relationship using in situ observations in South Korea for a recent 35-yr period, focusing on the role of convective rainfall. Scaling results show that hourly extreme precipitation undergoes a transition from a C-C rate to a super C-C rate at around 208C, supporting the statistical effect. The transition temperature observed in South Korea is, however, much higher than in European regions (128C), which seems to be due to the climatologically lower frequency of convective events in South Korea than in Europe. Nevertheless, the threshold fraction of convective precipitation when the scaling transition starts to occur is found to very similar between two regions, around 0.2, indicating the important role of convective events in shaping the scaling. On the other hand, convective extreme precipitation alone exhibits a super C-C scaling, suggesting that the physical effect is also at work in South Korea. Also, the scaling shows a robust peaklike shape with maximum precipitation intensity near 248C, which is closely linked with moisture limitation at high temperature, supporting the previous findings.
URI
http://oasis.postech.ac.kr/handle/2014.oak/38955
DOI
10.1175/JCLI-D-17-0075.1
ISSN
0894-8755
Article Type
Article
Citation
JOURNAL OF CLIMATE, vol. 30, no. 23, page. 9527 - 9537, 2017-12
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 MIN, SEUNG KI
Div of Environmental Science & Enginrg
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