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Cited 27 time in webofscience Cited 28 time in scopus
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Extracellular vesicles, especially derived from gram-negative bacteria, in indoor dust induce neutrophilic pulmonary inflammation associated with both Th1 and Th17 cell responses

Title
Extracellular vesicles, especially derived from gram-negative bacteria, in indoor dust induce neutrophilic pulmonary inflammation associated with both Th1 and Th17 cell responses
Authors
You-Sun KimEun-Jeong ChoiWon-Hee LeeSeong-Jin ChoiRoh, TYPark, JJee, YKZhou ZhuKoh, YYGho, YSKim, YK
POSTECH Authors
Roh, TYPark, JGho, YSKim, YK
Date Issued
Apr-2013
Publisher
willey
Abstract
Background Many bacterial components in indoor dust can evoke inflammatory pulmonary diseases. Bacteria secrete nanometre-sized vesicles into the extracellular milieu, but it remains to be determined whether bacteria-derived extracellular vesicles in indoor dust are pathophysiologically related to inflammatory pulmonary diseases. Objective To evaluate whether extracellular vesicles (EV) in indoor air are related to the pathogenesis of pulmonary inflammation and/or asthma. Methods Indoor dust was collected from a bed mattress in an apartment. EV were prepared by sequential ultrafiltration and ultracentrifugation. Innate and adaptive immune responses were evaluated after airway exposure of EV. Results Repeated intranasal application of indoor-dust-induced neutrophilic pulmonary inflammation accompanied by lung infiltration of both Th1 and Th17 cells. EV 50200nm in diameter were present (102.5g protein concentration/g dust) in indoor dust. These vesicles were internalized by airway epithelial cells and alveolar macrophages, and this process was blocked by treatment of polymyxin B (an antagonist of lipopolysaccharide, an outer-membrane component of Gram-negative bacteria). Intranasal application of 0.1 or 1g of these vesicles for 4weeks elicited neutrophilic pulmonary inflammation. This phenotype was accompanied by lung infiltration of both Th1 and Th17 cells, which were reversed by treatment of polymyxin B. Serum dust EV-reactive IgG1 levels were significantly higher in atopic children with asthma than in atopic healthy children and those with rhinitis or dermatitis. Conclusion & Clinical Relevance Indoor dust EV, especially derived from Gram-negative bacteria, is a possible causative agent of neutrophilic airway diseases.
URI
http://oasis.postech.ac.kr/handle/2014.oak/13880
DOI
10.1111/CEA.12085
ISSN
0954-7894
Article Type
Article
Citation
CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL ALLERGY, vol. 43, no. 4, page. 443 - 454, 2013-04
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 PARK, JAE SUNG
Dept of Mechanical Enginrg
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